8 Amazing Uses of Marriott’s 50,000-Point Free Night Certificate

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At the end of August, my family took our first “vacation” in six months. We drove up and down the California coast and stayed at some awesome hotels, redeeming hotel free night certificates that had been sitting for months. I love redeeming hotel certificates for their max value and knowing that a relaxing trip with my family can come without the hefty price tag. 

For other folks who are interested in luxury hotel stays, Chase has just the deal for you — a new welcome bonus on its Marriott Bonvoy Boundless™ Credit Card. Chase is now offering five free night certificates (worth up to 50,000 Marriott points each) after spending $5,000 in the first three months. Needless to say, this is quite an extraordinary offer!

Marriott Bonvoy Boundless card’s amazing new sign up offer

This offer is unlike any we have seen before because it comes in the form of five free night certificates — as opposed to a lump sum of Marriott Bonvoy points. New cardmembers can earn five free night certificates, each redeemable for a free hotel night up to 50,000 points, after spending $5,000 within the first three months after card opening.

The bonus on the Marriott Bonvoy Boundless™ Credit Card is essentially worth up to 250,000 Marriott points, which we value at $2,000! Normally this card offers a bonus of 75,000 to 100,000 points — so this new offer is more than double of what we usually see. This is likely the best welcome bonus of any credit card on the market right now.

The biggest downside with the free night certificates are that they do expire within 12 months of issue, so keep in mind how you’ll use them within a year of earning the welcome bonus. Hopefully, international travel will mostly be back to normal within a year, but domestic use of these certificates should be more feasible in the immediate future.

Some restrictions may prevent you from earning the sign up bonus, like the Chase 5/24 rule or the Marriott card rule. But if you are eligible, this welcome bonus is absolutely massive and could easily be worth five nights in a hotel that would cost upwards of $2,0000.

The Marriott Boundless card has a $95 annual fee and also comes with an anniversary free night award redeemable for a free night up to 35,000 points. This is a different card than its premium older sibling — the Marriott Bonvoy Brilliant™ American Express® Card. The Bonvoy Brilliant card carries a hefty $450 annual fee (see rates and fees) but also offers an annual up to 50,000-point free night certificate and an up to $300 Marriott credit.

The best hotels that cost 50,000 Marriott points a night

Keep in mind that Marriott’s 50,000 free night certificates are valid at any hotel for any night that costs 50,000 points or less. Although category 6 hotels will typically give you the best value (normally costing 50,000 points per night), you might also consider using your certificates for properties that cost 35,000 – 45,000 points per night if that fits within your travel plans.

I’ll also highlight a few category 7 hotels which can make for a fantastic certificate redemption if you can find off-peak dates to travel. Read our guide on the Marriott award chart for more details on what category properties your free night certificates will work at.

Without further ado, here are some of our favorite places to redeem Marriott 50,000 point free night certificates:

Ritz-Carlton Bali

I am incredibly biased about my love for the Ritz Carlton Bali because it was part of an amazing, round-the-world honeymoon that was quite literally the trip of a lifetime. The hotel is gorgeously appointed and sits right on the ocean, making it a great use of points or your free night certificate.

Tha spa at the Ritz-Carlton Bali. (Image courtesy of the Ritz-Carlton Bali)

Vespera on Ocean in Pismo Beach, CA

My girls and I stayed at the Vespera on Ocean in Pismo Beach last month as part of our road trip. This hotel is part of the Autograph Collection and opened recently. Even better, nightly rates hover around $500 all in so your free night certificate earns you a fantastic deal.

(Image courtesy of Marriott / Vespera on Ocean)

Kauai Marriott Resort

Kauai was on my shortlist for 2020 travel until coronavirus shutdowns prevented us from visiting this amazing Hawaiian island. The Kauai Marriott has nice pools and a great location on The Garden Island. It can often be quite pricey, so this is a great use of points.

(Image courtesy of Marriot Kauai Resort)

Delta Hotels Whistler Village

If you prefer snow to sand, consider using a certificate (or 5!) at the Delta Hotels Whistler Village property. This category 6 hotel can get quite costly during the ski season and is located in downtown Whistler.

(Photo by Alan V. Young / Getty Images)

JW Marriott Los Cabos Beach Resort and Spa

I love the Cabo area because it’s a quick flight from many parts of the U.S. and luxury hotels abound (for reasonable prices!). Use your free night certificates to stay at the gorgeous and well-rated JW Marriott Los Cabos where the base room has a beautiful ocean view and balcony.

Plus, there are few restrictions on Americans entering Mexico for tourism.

(Image courtesy of the JW Marriott Los Cabos Beach Resort and Spa)

Hotel Banke Opera Paris, Autograph Collection 

Paris is always a good idea… especially when you don’t have to pay out of pocket for your hotel. Most of Marriott’s centrally-located Paris hotels are in category 7 (and only within reach of your free night certificates when they’re at off-peak pricing), but the Hotel Banke Opera is surprisingly a category 6 property. This boutique hotel has beautiful city views, even from the base view rooms, and is often priced in the $400 per night range.

(Photo by Catarina Belova/Shutterstock)

Mesm Tokyo, Autograph Collection

Tokyo consistently sits atop many lists of “World’s Best Cities” lists and for good reason. If you’re eying a visit to the Japanese capital, I recommend you redeem points or free night certificates to save big time on expensive hotel costs. The Mesm Tokyo is generously priced as a category 6 and is close to the famous Tokyo Tower.

Stay at a Ritz-Carlton in Southern California during off-peak dates

Last but not least, I wanted to highlight several Ritz Carlton properties in California that could make for a fantastic getaway. The Ritz-Carlton properties in Half Moon Bay, Santa Barbara, Rancho Mirage, and Laguna Niguel are all fantastic hotels that offer luxurious accommodations.

Although they’re all category 7 hotels and typically priced very high (in the $500 – $1000 per night range), you can redeem free night certificates if you get lucky and travel during off-peak dates, where the hotels will be priced at 50,000 points a night.

(Image courtesy of The Ritz-Carlton, Half Moon Bay)

Bottom line

Free hotel night certificates are a great example of how points and miles allow for luxury stays that would have otherwise been impossible. I have personally stayed at several of the hotels on this list using free night certificates and they have all been wonderful — each and every property.

If you’re looking for your next big welcome bonus or starting to scheme your 2021 travel plans, the Marriott Bonvoy Boundless™ Credit Card card’s new five-night offer is tough to beat. For more ideas on how to use your certificates, read the best Marriott hotels in the U.S. to book with points and subscribe to our newsletter for more credit card guides and inspiration.

For the rates and fees of the Marriott Bonvoy Brilliant™ American Express® Card, please click here.

Jake Pearring is a contributor to Million Mile Secrets, he covers topics on points and miles, credit cards, airlines, hotels, and general travel.

Editorial Note: We're the Million Mile Secrets team. And we're proud of our content, opinions and analysis, and of our reader's comments. These haven’t been reviewed, approved or endorsed by any of the airlines, hotels, or credit card issuers which we often write about. And that’s just how we like it! :)

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