Easily Find Out Credit Card Open & Close Dates

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Easily Find Out Credit Card Open & Close Dates

Million Mile SecretsEasily Find Out Credit Card Open & Close DatesMillion Mile Secrets Team

We devote thousands of hours of research to help you get Big Travel with Small Money. You support us by signing-up for credit cards through partner links which earn us a commission. Here’s our full Advertising Policy.

Million Mile Secrets reader, Mary Beth commented:

We have a lot of credit cards and I have not kept track of when I opened, closed, etc.  Is there a way to find this out?

Great question, Mary Beth!

Tracking credit card open and close dates can help you decide if you are eligible for a sign-up bonus again.  It’s also important to know because Chase is limiting credit card approvals if you have ~5 or more new accounts on your credit report within the previous 24 months.

Lost Track Easily Find Out Credit Card Open Close Dates
Help Decide If You Should Apply for New Cards

Your credit card open dates will also give you an idea of when you will be charged your annual fee (if any).

I’ll explain the best ways to find the information you’re looking for!

View Your Credit Report

Link:   CreditKarma  

Link:   AnnualCreditReport.com 

Banks access your credit report whenever you apply for credit.  You can view the information on your credit report as well!

Your credit report contains information for each credit card you’ve opened, including:

  • Date of account opening (and closing, if applicable)
  • Credit limit
  • Monthly balance as of each statement date
  • Monthly payment history
Lost Track Easily Find Out Credit Card Open Close Dates
Check Your Credit Report for Important Information About Your Credit Card Accounts

In addition, you can (and should) get a free copy of your credit report every time you are denied credit.  Why?  Because it is free, and it doesn’t hurt to review your credit report for accuracy.

You are also entitled to a free copy of your credit report from each bureau every 12 months.

Here are links to the free or discounted request pages of the 3 credit bureaus:

A free copy of your Equifax report is also available through Credit Karma.

If you closed or have inactive accounts, these may be shown on your credit report indefinitely, but in most cases will be removed 10 years after the date of last activity.

Keep in mind each bank reports a new card opening to the credit bureaus at different times.  Generally, new cards are shown on your credit report within 30 to 60 days.

Contact Your Credit Card Customer Service

One easy way to find out when you opened a credit card is to contact your credit card company.  Call the phone number on the back of your card, or send a secure message through your online account.

Lost Track Easily Find Out Credit Card Open Close Dates
Call Your Credit Card Customer Service Number for Information on Account Open Dates and Annual Fees

Also, you can ask the customer service representative when your annual fee (if any) will appear on your billing statement.  If you are considering cancelling your card because of the annual fee, you might be able to have it waived.

Remember that banks use your approval date as your credit card open date and NOT the date you receive or activate your card.

Keep Your Own Records

When you have a lot of credit cards, staying organized is the most important thing you can do to make sure you get the most value out of your miles and points.

I like to keep a spreadsheet that tracks certain information, such as:

  • Approval date
  • Minimum spending requirement
  • Sign-up bonus
  • Credit limit
  • Annual fee amount (if any)
  • Close date

You can use your records to compare against your credit reports to confirm accuracy.

Bottom Line

Credit card open dates are determined based on the date you were approved for the card.

Contacting your credit card customer service over the phone or by writing a secure message can be an easy way to get information about your credit card open dates and annual fees (if any).

Also, you can see your credit card open and close dates on your credit report from CreditKarma, AnnualCreditReport.com, and the 3 credit bureaus.

It’s best to keep your own records on a spreadsheet or whatever method you’re comfortable with.  That way, you can double-check the information on your credit report!

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Today I had a collector calling me about adefaulted Credit card that s 30 or so years old. Ive contacted an attorney but to be honest arely remember the card. I am at present 60 and out of wor so even if I wanted to cant afford to do anything. I dont even remember it.

My question is, there anyway to find info on the card. I know the bank but not the number. I know its way beyond all the timelimits but the collectors were threatening me and I want to find the date of default if there is one.
Thx
Scott

Much to my dismay Credit Karma no longer allows you to sort my date of account opening. You have to open each account to see opening and closing dates. I asked they why they changed this,…they don’t know!

I just discovered that credit karma does not list opening dates any more. That is a loss of easy access to getting opening date for each card. Too bad.

Virginia A Paola

Partly for curiousity I applied for the new Chase Freedom card and I was rejected solely on their policy of too many credit cards. I made an attempt to get a reconsideration but was told I could switch my current Chase Freedom card with the new one. I resisted that because it is a card I have had for many years and doesn’t charge an annual fee. I felt the agents I spoke with were just this side of rude to me. The best one was to advise me to go to the local Chase Bank to plead my case. Since I bank online and am 80 years old and disabled I rejected that suggestion. For now I will just forget my application and work toward getting rid of Chase perhaps.

The problem with a credit report is that it does not show an account number nor a name of the card. So if you have or had many cards it would be difficult to use a credit report for the purpose of this topic.

CreditKarma lets you do a free account. It give you a Vantage, rather than a FICO score, which isn’t worth much, but under their “Credit Reports” tab, you can choose “Accounts,” and you will see a list of all your accounts with an Open Date. For the ones that say closed, you can click on them for more details, including the account closed date.

Because they’re using data from Experian and TransUnion, the updates can be a few weeks behind your actual open or close, but they are accurate once they show up. This should help folks set up a spreadsheet, and they can add to it as they open/close new accounts.

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