Is Chase Going to Shut You Down?

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Watch out if you aren’t using your Chase credit cards for regular spending and only going after bonus points offers!  Chase has updated the terms of their Chase Ultimate Rewards points earning credit cards.

Thanks to Million Mile Secrets reader Jon for pointing out that you could lose all of your points and have your account shut down if Chase thinks you’re abusing their system.  Here’s what you need to know.

How To Keep Your Chase Credit Cards From Being Shut Down

You Might Lose Your Points and Have Your Account Shut Down If You’re Not Careful!

What’s Changed?

Link:   Chase Ink Terms and Conditions (New)

Link:   Chase Sapphire Preferred Terms and Conditions (New)

Link:   Chase Freedom Terms and Conditions (New)

There’s new language in the terms and conditions for the Chase Ink, Chase Sapphire Preferred, and Chase Freedom cards that clearly states you could lose your points or be shut down for abusing the system.

The section “How You Could Be Prohibited From Earning or Using Points” states:

We may temporarily prohibit you from earning points or using points you’ve already earned:

If we suspect that you’ve misused the program in any way, for example…by repeatedly opening or otherwise maintaining credit card accounts for the sole purpose of generating rewards

And the section “How You Could Lose Your Points” contains similar language:

Your points don’t expire as long as your account is open, however, you’ll lose all your points if:

We believe that you’ve misused the program in any way, for example…by repeatedly opening or otherwise maintaining credit card accounts for the sole purpose of generating rewards

How To Keep Your Chase Credit Cards From Being Shut Down

Repeatedly Applying for Credit Cards Just to Earn Points Could Get You Shut Down!

The terms and conditions on these cards didn’t have such clear language in the past (you can read older versions of terms and conditions for the Chase Ink, Chase Sapphire Preferred, and Chase Freedom cards to compare).

In the older versions, Chase states that they “reserve the right to prohibit you from earning or redeeming points” if:

…there is any fraud or abuse related to the accrual of points

But now their terms are much more specific!

What Does This Mean?

Link:   FlyerTalk Chase Shut Down Thread

In the past, folks have reported having their accounts shut down by Chase for various reasons.  Some of the more common ones include:

  • Spending thousands per month on bonus categories (like 5X points at office supply stores or gas stations)
  • Transferring points to other people’s accounts (not your spouse or partner)
  • Opening up many credit card accounts in a short period of time (not just Chase accounts)
  • Overpaying credit card accounts, or running up a big balance early in the billing cycle then paying it off before the statement closes
  • Paying credit cards from many different accounts (like Serve, Bluebird, etc)

But now Chase has made it very clear that you could lose your points or be shut down for:

  • Signing-up for cards just to earn the bonus, then cancelling
  • Using cards solely to buy gift cards or other methods of “manufactured spending”
  • Repeatedly signing-up for cards just to earn the bonus or points

Most folks don’t abuse the system like this, and shouldn’t have to worry.  

But if you’re regularly opening new Chase credit cards, earning the sign-up bonus, and then closing the card without doing much further spending, only to re-apply later, you might want to slow down.

For instance, some Chase cards such as the Chase Freedom allow you to close the card and then sign-up for it again 24 months later.

Cancelling a card immediately after the sign-up bonus posts to your account is a huge red flag.  It’s much better to keep the card for 9 or 10 months, then decide if the card is worth keeping.

And you may want to be careful if you’re spending thousands of dollars per month at office supply stores to earn 5X Chase Ultimate Rewards points and then paying your bill with your Bluebird or Serve account.

How to Avoid Getting Shut Down

I’ve always said that it’s important to maintain a good relationship with the banks (pay bills on time, use credit responsibly, and don’t carry huge balances).

Chase is 1 of the biggest miles-and-points credit card issuers, so you do NOT want to get on their bad side.  And the Chase Ultimate Rewards program is 1 of my favorite ways to get Big Travel with Small Money, because their points transfer to so many great airline and hotel partners.

How To Keep Your Chase Credit Cards From Being Shut Down

Don’t Make the Banks Angry by Abusing the System!

The banks know there are folks who abuse the system.  And now Chase is making it clear they will shut you down if they catch you.

And because gift card fraud is such a huge concern, even services like Evolve Money are changing their rules to make it more difficult to use gift cards for paying bills.

Here are 4 tips to maintaining a good relationship with the bank.

1.   Don’t Cancel a Card Right After the Sign-Up Bonus Posts

Don’t apply for a card, cancel after getting the sign-up bonus, then apply for it again in the future.  This would definitely fall under the category of “repeatedly opening credit card accounts for the sole purpose of generating rewards.” 

Use your card now and then for regular expenses, and keep it at least until it’s time to decide whether the annual fee makes it worth keeping.

And cards like the Chase Freedom don’t have an annual fee, so it’s a good card to keep long-term to build your credit history.  And you can earn a lot of points (even with regular spending) on their rotating bonus categories.

2.   Don’t Over-Do Bonus Spending

If you’ve been spending thousands of dollars per month at office supply stores to earn 5X points on the Chase Ink cards, you may want to slow down.

Spending thousands and thousands of dollars, especially using 1 credit card, is a sure way to get noticed.  That said, there don’t seem to be any hard and fast rules about how much is too much.

How To Keep Your Chase Credit Cards From Being Shut Down

Everyone Uses Their Chase Cards to Get Points for Meals! It’s Folks Who Spend Thousands Each Month Who Might Need to Scale Back

Keep in mind Chase recently changed its terms and conditions, so what’s worked in the past might not work in the future.  Moderation is important!

But don’t be afraid to use you card for bonus category spending, like meals or travel.  We all do that – that’s why we got the cards in the 1st place!

3.   Take It Slow

It can be tempting, especially for folks just starting out, to apply for lots of credit cards in a short period of time.  This could send the signal that you’re desperate for new credit and that might make banks nervous.

A better strategy is to start out slow with just a few cards.  Use them regularly and make your payments on time.

4.   Be a Good Customer

Use your credit cards occasionally for regular spending like meals, groceries, and gas.  Don’t just put them in your sock drawer after you’ve met minimum spending requirements.

How To Keep Your Chase Credit Cards From Being Shut Down

Paying Your Bill Each Month Over the Years Establishes a Strong Relationship With Chase, as Does Opening a Checking Account

Paying your bills on time and keeping cards open establishes a history with the bank over the years.  You might even consider opening a bank account with Chase if they have a branch near you.

As with everything in our miles-and-points hobby, moderation is important!  Don’t get greedy and you should be fine.

Bottom Line

Chase has updated the terms and conditions on the Chase Ink, Chase Sapphire Preferred, and Chase Freedom cards.

They now clearly state that you’ll lose your points or have your account shut down if you use your credit card accounts only to earn points, or apply for cards over and over just to earn points.

This should NOT affect folks who use their credit cards responsibly and exercise moderation in their spending.  But if you’ve been spending thousands of dollars on gift cards each month, you may want to be careful.

Will this affect how you spend on your credit cards, or which cards you spend on?

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58 responses to “Is Chase Going to Shut You Down?

  1. So it is now abusive to only use a card for the particular rotating or non-rotating bonus category? That seems like a stretch on Chase’s part…

  2. Bottom line is don’t do any of the MS I explicitly tell you how to do – ’cause I don’t – I’m pimping so many cards to lazy/incompetent noobs and makin’ soooo much money, I can’t be bothered to MS!

  3. @Dan, probably no one is going to get shutdown for making real purchases in just one category on a card. But Chase is stretching the definitions just so they can shutdown just about whomever.

  4. This definitely smells like a class action coming down against them if Chase cancels for a lot of people. Definitely the change of terms are in bad taste in behalf of Chase.

  5. Hopefully they’re just being a little more transparent. I’m sure they would have put this under “abuse” in their old terms but now it seems like they’re giving us examples of what they consider abuse. Unless they start becoming more strict in general I would say 99% of us won’t be affected. Curious to see how it plays out though.

  6. Does this only apply to Chase cards that earn Ultimate Rewards or also to specific airline or hotel affiliated cards?

  7. It’s about time! Think about it. Those points cost the bank something. If all you do is meet the minimum spend and then cancel, Chase has most likely either lost money or didn’t make enough to make it worth their while on these promotions. I like playing the game as much as the next person, but I can certainly understand why Chase is doing this.

  8. I don’t see why this is posted in the blog:

    “But now Chase has made it very clear that you could lose your points or be shut down for: … Using cards solely to buy gift cards or other methods of “manufactured spending”

    Chase has NOT made any such “very clear” statement about buying gift cards. If anything they’ve made very vague statements that could be applied to anything.

  9. I appreciate reading it from the blog, so I can decide what to do. This is a lot better than potentially getting all points taken away, then learn about the new Chase wording.

  10. This is a good wake up call for those who have gotten a bit too greedy with MS, like myself. Although there are other issuers, Chase feeds the best and being shut down would be quite a punishment.

  11. How much is to much? I’m doing one VGC per week at the Grocery store and one at the Pharmacy. Also have some Buxxx cards and a Serve. This looks petty to me after ready of others MSing but I don’t know how many cards they are using.

  12. @steve J.

    For that answer you’d probably have to call Chase and ask, which is NOT suggested. I would guess it’s hard coded into their system. Maybe you get flagged for a transaction that is too high or out of your norm, like a fraud warning, then a human looks at your account, sees other things going on, like odd amounts of spend at grocery stores, etc. Maybe based on your credit limit the system will flag a particularly pattern or sum of charges over a week or month. Some people like to recycle their credit line multiple times over one statement period to maximize points. Ex say your CL is $5,000, you can spend $5k, pay it off a day later, spend another $5k, rinse and repeat. Recycling I would suspect is a strong indication of MS. So it really depends on your situation and all those factors, your CL, your income provided, your spend per transaction, where you spend, etc. Just make sure to get those Chase points out of there, transfer them. Don’t want to be sitting on 300,000 UR points and have your account shut down.

  13. No big. Just transfer out your UR points every month like I’ve been doing for years. There’s no clawback.

  14. Spread your MS across multiple cards from multiple banks. As for Chase Ink cards, you earn 5x on the first $50,000 annually in 5x categories. Therefore you should be fine doing about $4,000 per month. No need to do more than that. Definitely recommend holding on to cards for 10-12 months before canceling. Better off going for a retention bonus and if they say no, move the credit line to other open cards and close the card.

  15. @Patrick Businesses pay fees to accept credit cards and those fees cover a portion of the points earned. It is not all from the banks. Merchant fees vary whether the customer pays with a debit card or a rewards credit card.

  16. I love that macro photo of the ball point pen. Crazy DOF. Off-topic I know, but you’ve used it before, and I love it.

  17. “◾Overpaying credit card accounts, or running up a big balance early in the billing cycle then paying it off before the statement closes”- why is it bad, to pay off before the due date? I always try to pay early and then re check the balance on the due date. How is that bad?

  18. @Lana,

    It’s not bad. You can pay off your credit card balance as early as you’d like, just as you could any other bill. Perhaps the emphasis should be on running up a big balance early on because that doesn’t look like natural spending. Most people don’t open a credit card and spend thousands on day one or two in bonus categories. I think the takeaway here is to practice moderation if you think what you’re doing could violate Chase’s broad new rule, especially if you have a lot of points at stake.

  19. @Lana, I think the statement about prepaying your balance is aimed at people who use multiple times their credit limit per month. Say your credit limit is $5,000. You charge $4,000 and you pay it off right away. Then you charge another $4,000 and pay that off right away. By the end of the month, maybe you charged $20,000 on that one credit card. The bank might not like to see that much spending activity in regards to the size of the credit limit.

  20. @ preacher ‘ transfer out your UR points every month ‘ – what does that mean ?
    Where are the points going ? Please explain.

  21. I’m very concerned to read this post. Thank you, Daraius, for breaking this critical information, which frankly leaves me doubting Chase’s commitment to me as a good customer. I noticed some time ago that Chase cards got near 100% of my spending due to the array of benefits and how they fit together. If Chase is messaging that we shouldn’t take full advantage of their cards, that means they don’t want our business. For example, we’re been doing a lot of home improvement this year, and Lowes and Home Depot and Staples and Chase have benefitted from thousands and thousands of gift card dollars spent. Using a Lowes credit card will give me 5% off every order, every time, without having to be bothered with trips to Staples, orders that don’t go through properly, etc. Am I *not* supposed to take full advantage of one of the biggest benefits of the Ink cards, even if it’s the only way I use their Ink cards? I completely get that there are some crafty folks out there doing some insane (and ingenious) stuff to MS, but how is it EVER abuse if Chase’s customers play by Chase’s rules? Chase also stipulates that if you don’t pay your bill on time, you pay usury interest rates … and that’s not abuse?

  22. This is bunk. MOST of us sign up for credit cards for the sole reason of earning miles/points bonuses. If Chase doesn’t want customers to receive a certain number of bonuses, then it should set a more restrictive rule as to how often a customer may do so, as it has with its 24-month per-bonus rule. To add these boogeyman T&Cs is bullspit. Almost all of us who play these games will abide by a CC issuer’s rules. So set rules that make sense, then live with them. Don’t try to scare people with vague threats.

  23. I’m hoping in this case that Chase’s bark is bigger than their bite. Maybe they’re just using stronger language to deter people from doing too much churning. Or maybe the head of their credit card rewards department has been told they need to find a way to pay out less rewards. in the end it always comes down to money so this is just a way for Chase to save a little more each year.

  24. Thanks for posting this news Daraius. As uncertain as parts of it may be, it’s valuable for us to be aware that Chase indeed has specified circumstances wherein it may shut down accounts and revoke points. Knowing just where the line may be a challenge, yet prudence does counsel restraint and a tad bit of common sense. As you note, it’s counter-productive to alienate the hands that feed us. Alas, to some in the m/s community, the attitude seems to be abuse it (in our tight circle) till we lose it…..

  25. I guess they camn only pull with with UR point, because that what they control. They don’t have any means to close just say your southwest account or any other account. At any rate, I’m not too concerned because I earned those points and they are mine to keep!!

  26. I have a Chase mortgage and a Chase preferred checking account with direct deposit. I do about $3,000/month (CL is $11,000) in manufactured spending with my Ink card. Any opinions out there about how safe/unsafe I am doing this?
    I use my Ink cards for other expenses as well – not just MS. Would Chase really shut down a customer with a mortgage and direct deposit for doing a few thousand in manufactured spending per month?

  27. well if you did get shut down for spending $250,000 on my Saphire MasterCard in SAMs club in 1 year now what
    yes it was for buisness but
    I tried I think 3 times to get a buisness ink from them always got deinied
    now what

  28. HERE IS THE REASON CHASE IS STARTING TO CLAMP DOWN ON SOME OF THEIR BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS:

    As you’ve requested, the Weiss Watchdog is monitoring the rating of a company for you, and we’re writing to let you know that the rating of that company has just changed. Here it is…

    CHASE BANK USA NA

    Was Downgraded to D+ from C-

    So basically Chase is losing money and lots of it. They are highly leveraged to dangerous derivatives and other risky financial investments. If you have an account there with actual money in a checking/savings/IRA, you might consider moving it ASAP especially if it falls over the 250K FDIC threshhold. But even then it may take awhile to get your money back in your hands if they do go Bankrupt. Too big to fail was what happened in the last crisis. They don’t have the money this time to prop up the institutions that will fail in the next round.

  29. “Spending thousands per month on bonus categories (like 5X points at office supply stores or gas stations)”
    Why would this cause Chase to cancel someone’s Chase Freedom card? Chase Freedom already has a cap of $1500 for earning the 5x bonus categories which should avoid abuse.

    “Opening up many credit card accounts in a short period of time (not just Chase accounts)”
    So Chase is continuously checking what other non-Chase credit cards you have?

    “Overpaying credit card accounts, or running up a big balance early in the billing cycle then paying it off before the statement closes”
    What’s wrong with paying off the balance before the closing date? I sometimes make expensive purchases (ie airplane tickets, hotels, etc) and pay off the balance soon after – why does Chase consider this abuse?

  30. Thanks for the update/warning. I suspect the warning/new terms is most directed to those whose MS is commensurate with their credit limit–people who spend most of their utilization more than once per month, including those for who pay off their cards when close to their limit and then charge again close to their limit for obvious MS spend. Even if this isn’t MS, it is a credit risk for Chase (or any other credit provider)–which is why credit utilization is the biggest component of everyone’s credit score. As long as you’re not nearing your credit card limit, you likely aren’t at risk. If you’re repeatedly charging up your card and paying it off a few times or more each month, you likely are approaching or exceeding your actual credit utilization limit–and that is a warning sig to any credit provider.

  31. Meike, of course companies pay a fee. But, let’s say it’s 2.9%. If all you do is charge $3K and then close the account, it would only amount to $87 that Chase would receive. After giving you 50,000 UR points, I imagine they are losing money. I certainly can’t blame them for wanting to crack down on this – especially if you do the same thing for multiple Chase cards.

  32. Pingback: Miles and Points Update | Miles For Family

  33. I saw these terms in a recent mailing I got and was wondering about the change…

    Anyway, good of Dar to make it well known to others, but I find it a bit funny/hypocritical in that he writes it as if he hasn’t done everything he’s mentioned and illustrated how others should do it too.

    Before anyone gets all hot and bothered, I know it’s everyone’s individual choice on whether they do A, B, or C, but the tone of the article is just comical coming from what I’ve read here over the past couple of years.

    -Doug

  34. Pingback: [Consolidated]Chase closed my CC account(s) - Page 35 - FlyerTalk Forums

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  36. i find it rather disingenuous that you counsel against MS and state that “Most of us won’t be affected”, when MS is the cornerstone of your blog. when one thinks of MMS, the first vision is Emily standing in front of a gift card rack in any # of past or present MS havens.

    frankly, the fact that your income is from affiliate links, many being Chase, makes for a fairly good entrapment case. it’s not like Chase doesn’t know what your (and others’) blog is. They do. And they are a willing business partner of yours. So they’re going to shut down cards, applied for thru links in your blog, for doing what you advocate in your blog?!? in doing so, they seize UR points and do real damage to the individual’s credit.

    A good lawyer would love to take on such a case. legally, i question whether Chase can lure you with the carrot and then whack you with the stick when you eat the carrot.

  37. I received a targeted offer for the Chase Ink Plus Visa business card. I already have the Ink Plus Mastercard and my husband has the Ink bold. Am I risking the wrath of Chase by applying for this card, even though I received a targeted mailing?

  38. Pingback: Road Warriorette Weekend Express - Road Warriorette - Road Warriorette

  39. Pingback: New Warnings from Chase on Account Shutdowns

  40. I read the entire thread on Flyertalk. The people who are being shut down by Chase for multiple reasons, and some closures are very obviously done because they suspect abuse:
    1) Applying for too many cards at once. One person applied for and received 4 o cards in 32 days. Big no-no, which Daraius warned about from the beginning. It’s too obvious why you are using the cards.
    2) Paying your credit card bills with multiple accounts, including Bluebird, Serve, Walmart Bill Pay, and your own checking account.
    3) Low income to credit card limit total.
    4) Many credit inquiries.
    5) Suspicious spend at office supply stores or other 5X point to spend ratio.

    I was worried for a bit about ours, but we have had excellent credit for 42 years (we are old), and I applied for three cards in six months. My husband applied for two cards (Chase) in a year. He plans to try for the Companion Pass with Southwest toward the end of this year. We will see if they have a problem with two SW cards pretty much simultaneously, including one business and one regular card.

  41. well, chase has responded to my spending by increasing my spending limit from 5000 to 10000. i think i am going to pull my points out of there for now. kind of sucks that i have to pull them out into on airline account without diversifying.

  42. The only reason I cumulate chase points is the Airline tickets.
    Do you think it’s a good way to transfer the points to United Airline to avoid any damage of points?

  43. @JP’s question is good, please answer. Darius, I’d like to use my points for a long air trip ticket or upgrade, not sure where yet (China or Europe), but probably on a United partner airline. Is it best to transfer Ultimate Reward points to United to use on a partner airline and book through United? Will this avoid excess surcharges? Thanks.

  44. Whoever posted that Weiss Watchdog site–well, I suggest you look somewhere else for advice on bank health. Chase is making a fortune with an 11% Return On Equity,

    As to shutting down accounts, I can speak from personal experience. Chase actually completely made up reasons for terminating my home equity application at the same time (they had to backtrack and say they were sorry but that the actual reason was too much debt relative to income, which they then had to backtrack without any explanation when i pointed out I don’t have ANY debt). I must admit closing ALL my credit card accounts because , as they admitted, “spending patterns were not as expected” on one of them–then closing a bank account with $60,000 in it at 0% wasn’t a great idea on their part. I simple letter explaining the issue would have been fine.
    I jabbed them with the fact they had not REALLY closed all my accounts because I had business accounts under tax id ‘s(only 1100 in it), I know they must have spent quite a bit of time finding the accounts. GOOD FOR THEM.
    I didn’t lose any UR’s because the bank account closure letter came first and I knew what that meant.
    I find it funny AMEX is HAPPY to let me buy gift cards at 3% off and give me MR’s to boot.
    No, it did not hurt my credit and I don’t care what Chase does. They have proven to be LIARS.
    I had taken to sending back all their prepaid envelopes empty just to cost them 50 cents each (US atty will be contacting me any day, I’m sure).
    So, now I have a CFPB complaint on the home loan app.

  45. Hi Daraius,
    In light of all this, I currently have two Chase Southwest cards that I got two years ago when earning the companion pass. It is now running out and I would like to know if I should cancel them both and then apply for the other version or what is the best way to get my companion pass again?
    Thank you for always keeping us up on these things!
    Chara

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  47. If Chase closed all your accounts, how soon or will you re-apply the credit cards with Chase again?

  48. I had 2 Southwest Cards for about 18 months, a Hyatt card for 12 months and a Chase Ink business Plus for about 5 months and a United card for 10 years. Last month, I closed one of the SW personal cards and then was approved for the SW Premier card (different one from the one I closed.)

    Chase just shut them all down for “reputational risk.” I didn’t do any manufactured spend at all.

  49. Just an fyi: I complained to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Chase reversed their decision to close 4 of the 5 accounts they said they were shutting me down for “”reputational risk.”

    Chase’s response on the CFPB website:

    “Relief
    We’ve reversed our decision to close your accounts ending in xxxx, xxxx, xxxx and xxxx
    After further review, we have reversed our decision to close the Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards Visa(R) Signature account ending in xxxx, Hyatt VISA Signature account ending in xxxx, Southwest Airlines Rapid Rewards Visa(R) Business Signature account ending in xxxx, and United MileagePlus VISA Signature account ending in xxxx.

    Dispute

    We reviewed our records and determined that the Chase INK VISA Signature Business account ending in xxxx will be closed on February 22, 2015, because continuing the relationship creates possible reputational risk for the company. “

  50. i don,t get it does it effect your credit rating

  51. I’m a noob. Steep learning curve and a lot to learn with MS… I made a few mistakes ramping up too fast and it remains to be seen if I will pay a price. My biggest one was applying for too many cards too fast. I had also been doing a series of applications to get 0% interest cards to best park a small debt for a year. All the applications were done in 48 hours and probably hard dinged my credit a few times (something I am just learning about now too). Knocked my scores way down (but assuming I do everything right with credit rebuild, I should be ok in not too long). I digress.

    So I had gotten approved on Chase Sapphire Preferred and Chase British Air… as well as Cap 1 Venture. Each one… I got one for me and one for my wife. Did a little MS with GC and Bluebird. About $1k on the Chase Cards (several purchases, unrelated amounts).

    I had applied for INK thinking it would be a good everyday card and got turned down. This was before I knew it would be smart to slow down (typical of me… anybody else?) I called Chase to see they would reconsider (oops!). I got a kid on the phone who started beating me up. “Sir I see you applied for 1-2-3-4-5-6 cards this year (3 of them at Chase) and there were other cards applied for at your address (huh… he knows that?). And I see you have made several purchases of cash equivalent gift cards at a grocery chain. I think you should know that Chase offers bonuses to their customers because they contract deals with other corporations at great expense. If you are taking advantage…. At this point I started to blank out.

    He said he would review this all again and send a letter. I think I remember him saying something about thirty days….

    I figured this is a good forum for advice on strategy going forward with the Chase. I figured some regular everyday spending on the Chase cards might dilute things and make me appear like a regular customer.

    Any ideas good people?

    BTW Flaming my mistakes is unnecessary. I already know I am a doofus.

    -I know its only rock n roll but I like it.

  52. Pingback: Applying for Chase Credit Cards [Consolidated] - Page 219 - FlyerTalk Forums

  53. Chase shutdown my sapphire and southwest last Oct 2014 due to MS. When can I apply again to have chase credit card? Or Im not allowed anymore to get any of their credit card?

  54. For the people that were shut down, how much spending were you doing that led to you getting shut down? What exactly were you purchasing and in what amounts?

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  56. Chase shut me and my wife out no reason. Honestly I do chrun but not abusive.

  57. Apparently Chase is not only shutting off accounts it considers used by “abusers.” I have had a Slate Card that has been an account that originated with a bank that was bought out several times, ending up with Chase. I kept the card purely as a back-up emergency card and never used it. They cancelled it saying that the reason was due to lack of activity.