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I Hoarded My Hyatt Points and Now I’m Paying the Price

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I Hoarded My Hyatt Points and Now I’m Paying the Price

Joseph HostetlerI Hoarded My Hyatt Points and Now I’m Paying the PriceMillion Mile Secrets Team

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INSIDER SECRET: Airline miles and hotel points depreciate, just like currency. The longer you hold onto your points, the more likely it is that they will lose value when airlines and hotel chains periodically increase their award prices.

I did something I tell people never to do.

I hoarded my Hyatt points for too long and found that a few resorts I had been lusting after, now cost 20% to 25% more points per night.

That’s beyond frustrating, but I’m not too bothered, because Hyatt points are really easy to earn. However, if I had been a little more aggressive with my trip booking, I’d have saved tens of thousands of points.

Hyatt points are always a good investment. My wife and I stayed at the all-inclusive Hyatt Zilara in Cancun last week. (Photo by Joseph Hostetler/Million Mile Secrets)

Procrastination Dented My Hyatt Points Stash

The two Hyatt hotels I most want to visit are:

For years, they have been on my wish list. Not only do these five-star resorts have fabulous reviews, but also the award price is very fair. That’s a big reason I want to visit. They’re a sweet spot on the Hyatt award chart.

However, a few months ago these hotels jumped in price:

If I want to stay four days at either of these hotels, I must come up with an extra 20,000 Hyatt points. I guess that’s the price I pay for postponing vacation plans for five years.

I’m miffed at the price increase, but I know that both hotels are still a great deal with points. A night’s stay for 30,000 Hyatt points can easily be worth $650 per night. No-brainer.

There are plenty of ways to earn Hyatt points:

Card Sign-Up Bonus & Minimum Spending RequirementsOur Review
The World Of Hyatt Credit CardaUp to 50,000 Hyatt points:
- 25,000 bonus points after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months
- 25,000 more bonus points after you spend a total of $6,000 on purchases in the first 6 months of account opening
Full World of Hyatt Card review
If you have one of the three cards above, you can transfer points to Hyatt from the following cards:
Ink Business Preferred℠ Credit Card


80,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points after spending $5,000 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your accountFull review of the Ink Business Preferred
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card
60,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points after spending $4,000 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your accountFull review of the Chase Sapphire Preferred
Chase Sapphire Reserve50,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points after spending $4,000 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your account
Full review of the Chase Sapphire Reserve
And if you have one of the above cards, you can transfer points from the following cards:
Ink Business Unlimited℠ Credit Card$500 bonus (50,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points) after spending $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your accountFull review of the Ink Business Unlimited
Ink Business Cash℠ Credit Card$500 bonus (50,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points) after spending $3,000 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your accountFull review of the Ink Business Cash
Chase Freedom Unlimited$150 bonus (15,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points) after spending $500 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your accountFull Chase Freedom Unlimited review
Chase Freedom$150 bonus (15,000 Chase Ultimate Rewards points) after spending $500 on purchases within the first 3 months of opening your accountFull review of the Chase Freedom

These cards are solid not just for staying at Hyatt hotels. I’ve had the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card, Chase Freedom, and Chase Freedom Unlimited for years and I use them all regularly because they each have their own special powers. Read our card reviews if you want to know more about them.

What Are the Other Options?

Use Points to “Buy” Your Hotel Room

Award prices change often. If a change occurs, and you don’t have enough points to book your stay, you may still have options.

I love collecting Chase Ultimate Rewards points and transferring them to Hyatt. That is how I booked a free stay at the Hyatt Zilara all-inclusive hotel (which cost ~$425 per night). I’ve also used my points on many occasions to book hotels through the Chase Travel Portal. Using this method, you don’t have to worry about award prices. Instead, you’re focused on the cash price. The lower the cash price, the fewer points you need.

Check Out Booking Sites Like Airbnb

Another option to check out if your free vacation will cost you more than expected is Airbnb. It’s an excellent way to save a TON on accommodations if you don’t have a sufficient points balance to cover the entire trip. If you’re not familiar with the booking site, Airbnb allows you to book home stays and experiences offered by local hosts.

Your dollar will stretch further if you book with Airbnb, rather than with a hotel. For example, in Saint Lucia I booked a villa through Airbnb for $190 per night.

The private villa was in Soufriere, the trendy part of Saint Lucia. (Photo by Joseph Hostetler/Million Mile Secrets)

The villa had two bedrooms, two bathrooms, a gigantic deck, a private swimming pool, a dedicated work room, insanely high vaulted ceilings and a kitchen that I swear I’ve seen on MTV’s “Cribs.” That simply can’t be achieved at a hotel for $190 per night.

Bottom Line

Don’t stockpile your points unless you’ve got something in mind for them. It’s always good to have some kind of reserve for emergencies or last-minute getaways, but you’ve got to understand that points depreciate. Generally speaking, a point is worth less today than it was five years ago, because prices increase. If you’re saving for a dream vacation, don’t keep putting it off. It’ll cost you down the road.

You can subscribe to our newsletter for more miles-and-points musings like this in the future. We’ll always tell you when a good deal crops up.

The World Of Hyatt Credit Card

The World Of Hyatt Credit Card

  • Earn 25,000 Bonus Points after you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. Plus, 25,000 Bonus Points after you spend $6,000 total within 6 months of account opening.
  • Free nights start at 5,000 points
  • Receive 1 free night at any Category 1-4 Hyatt hotel or resort after your Cardmember anniversary
  • Earn an extra free night at any Category 1-4 Hyatt hotel if you spend $15,000 during your cardmember anniversary year
  • Get automatic World of Hyatt Elite status and 5 qualifying night credits every year as long as your account is open
  • Earn 2 qualifying night credits towards tier status everytime you spend $5,000 on your card
  • Earn 9 points total for Hyatt stays - 4 Bonus Points per $1 spent at Hyatt hotels & 5 Base Points per $1 you can earn as a World of Hyatt member
  • Earn 2 Bonus Points per $1 spent at restaurants, on airlines tickets purchased directly from the airlines, on local transit and commuting and on fitness club and gym memberships

More Info

Editorial Note: We're the Million Mile Secrets team. And we're proud of our content, opinions and analysis, and of our reader's comments. These haven’t been reviewed, approved or endorsed by any of the airlines, hotels, or credit card issuers which we often write about. And that’s just how we like it! :)

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Didn’t find anything useful with this article BUT I will say I was also disappointed in the increase with points on the properties I either enjoyed or dreamed of going to.

I cringed when I read your statement that “Hyatt points are always a good investment.” You should look up the definition of the word when you get a chance.

Who is going to travel over 7 thousand miles to Maldives from the states for only 4 nights? The jet lag alone will take you 3 days at least.

Boy – tough crowd here so I won’t pile on. Your warnings about point devaluation are worth considering. The points are more akin to developing country currencies than today’s low dollar inflation. But one other factor is time: if you anticipate having a lot more flexibility a few years out it may be worth the risk of devaluation. Then again, that may be more relevant for airline miles than hotel points.

Very classy undershirt that you advertise million miles secrets maybe in hopes of getting more freebies. I can’t believe how low this website has sunk, how all you do is use th space to link all the credit cards possible where you can get your commissions! And all the inexperienced yougnstners that are used for writers. Not much longer here, just I like to read for a luagh.

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