JetBlue TrueBlue points value: How much are they worth?

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Similar to Southwest, JetBlue uses a revenue-based award chart. This means that the value of your points is tied to the cash price of the ticket. So if you’ve earned a stash of JetBlue points, you should use them because you won’t be able to maximize them or find any sweet spots in the way you can with other rewards programs. They have a fixed value of around 1.3-1.4 cents apiece.

Let’s take a look at a few examples that’ll show you how the value of JetBlue points has been calculated. And don’t forget, a trick to getting more value from your points is to open the JetBlue Plus Card, which will rebate you 10% of the points you use!

Examples of value you can get for JetBlue points

Example 1:

Here’s an example of flights between Denver and St. Thomas. Who else is ready for a tropical getaway?! 

As you can see, cash prices in April 2021 range from $205 to $530.

While award prices range from 15,500 to 57,500. JetBlue doesn’t have an award chart. It’s easy to see that the award price is tied to the cash price of the ticket.

If you purchased the $205 ticket for 15,500 points instead of cash, you’d get a value of 1.3 cents per point. Or, consider the flight on April 9 that costs $530. It can be purchased for 37,300, so you’d get a similar value of 1.4 cents apiece.

Example 2:

Don’t forget that you can use JetBlue points for partner flights, sometimes allowing you to get outsized value for your rewards. Such is the case for many other rewards programs too.

For example, say a round-trip business class flight from the East Coast to Hawaii costs more than $1,960+ (1.4 cents x 140,000 points). In that case, you’ll get a better than the average value for JetBlue points by redeeming your rewards on airline partner Hawaiian Airlines. Because the average value of JetBlue points is 1.4 cents apiece.

(Photo by Shane Myers Photography/Shutterstock)

Miles vs. Cash calculator

Deciding when to use rewards versus when to use cash isn’t always a straightforward task. So we created a miles vs. cash calculator to make things a lot easier for you. 

Using the calculator is simple. All you have to do is:

  • Select which airline miles you’d like to use
  • Find the cash price of the exact ticket you plan to book
  • Enter the number of miles your trip will cost
  • Include any taxes and fees associated with your award ticket (like the $5.60 airport security fee) 

Should I pay with points or cash?

Points valuations are based on MMS calculation and not provided by the loyalty programs

Input the cash price of the ticket, including any taxes/fees

$

Miles required to purchase

Most award tickets will have cash cost, such as taxes and fuel

(Optional)

$

Input the cash price of the stay, including any taxes/fees

$

Points required to purchase

Most award nights will have resort fees for the stay

(Optional)

$

Fill out the inputs to get a payment recommendation

We recommend paying with

Total savings

Value of cash :

Value of + fee:

Bottom line

Determining the value of JetBlue points isn’t as complicated as it is with other rewards programs because JetBlue’s program is a revenue-based one. The price of an award ticket is tied to the cash price of the ticket, so it’s always easy to know the value of your points. On average, JetBlue points are worth 1.3 to 1.4 cents apiece.

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Deborah Atchison is a contributor to Million Mile Secrets, she covers topics on points and miles, credit cards, airlines, hotels, and general travel.

Editorial Note: We're the Million Mile Secrets team. And we're proud of our content, opinions and analysis, and of our reader's comments. These haven’t been reviewed, approved or endorsed by any of the airlines, hotels, or credit card issuers which we often write about. And that’s just how we like it! :)

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