We devote thousands of hours of research to help you get Big Travel with Small Money. You support us by signing-up for credit cards through partner links which earn us a commission. Here’s our full Advertising Policy.

What is an Affiliate Link & How Can You Get One?

What is an Affiliate Link & How Can You Get One?

Million Mile SecretsWhat is an Affiliate Link & How Can You Get One?Million Mile Secrets Team

We devote thousands of hours of research to help you get Big Travel with Small Money. You support us by signing-up for credit cards through partner links which earn us a commission. Here’s our full Advertising Policy.

[Disclosure:  None of the links in this post are affiliate links!]

I’ve always placed disclosures at the TOP of each blog post whenever a blog post contains a link which pays us a commission (often called affiliate links).  And I’m extremely proud that my Hot Deals pages almost always have the best links to credit card offers regardless of whether they pay me a commission or not.

Readers sometimes ask how they can get these affiliate links for themselves, and there seems to be a big interest in affiliate link practices and disclosure on FlyerTalk and other blogs, so I thought I’d write a few posts on it.

What is an affiliate link?

An affiliate link is a way to identify which website generated a sale for advertisers.

For example, Emily and I get a commission if you apply for certain credit cards using links found on the Million Mile Secrets blog.  And we’re always very grateful to readers who apply for cards using our links. 🙂

I’m not allowed to disclose how much each affiliate links pays in cash, but you can get a good estimate by googling.  I suspect that the affiliate marketing company doesn’t want folks comparing their commission with others and negotiating for a higher commission!

How Can I Get My Own Affiliate Links?

Enterprising readers often email to ask how they can get their own affiliate links to use themselves or to send to their friends!  I get my links from FlexOffers since I’m too small to get them directly from the banks.  Credit Karma and Credit Card Broker are other affiliate marketing company which provides affiliate links.

I’ve heard from readers that while it is easy to get approved to join the affiliate marketing companies, it isn’t easy to get approved for many of the credit card affiliate programs.  You usually require a website with a decent amount of traffic before you can get approved for credit cards.

And readers say that sometimes their affiliate manager is not very responsive to their needs.

Another option could be to investigate Commission Junction and Bankrate’s creditcards.com.  American Express used to offer extra points to cardholders who referred other cardholders, but they no longer seem to be doing that.  I wrote about that before when I told folks that they were better off not using my links for the American Express Starwood card if they could refer or get referred themselves.

Why Are Affiliate Links Bad?

But not ALL affiliate links are for the best available offer.  For example, the affiliate links (which pay a commission) to the Citi American Airlines credit card is for only 30,000 miles when there are better links for 40,000 miles and 50,000 miles.

Many websites try to direct you to the best offer, but there is an obvious conflict of interest if one link (with a lower sign-up bonus) pays the website owner more than another link.

But sometimes the links with the higher sign-up bonus have technically expired, but still work (like the Citi American Airlines card with 50,000 miles).  Or require you to attempt to make a hotel reservation (like I wrote with the Marriott or Hyatt cards).

The most common question I’ve received is from folks asking if they will really get 50,000 miles for applying for the Citi American Airlines card using the links on the blog.  I can’t guarantee 50,000 miles, but I let them know that both Emily and I have got the bonus miles, as have readers and folks on this FlyerTalk thread, and they almost certainly will get 50,000 miles if approved (based on everyone’s experience).

I don’t get a commission for the 50,000 mile cards, but I owe it to readers to encourage them to apply for a card with 20,000 more miles versus a card with 30,000 miles, but which pays me a commission.

You can also make the case that since websites earn money from credit card commissions, some go out of their way to promote offers which aren’t in their readers interest or to intentionally mislead readers to apply for a card which isn’t necessarily the best offer for that card.

Or sometimes, a website will mention a better offer in passing, but continue to promote an inferior offer in ads and in other posts on the website.

On the other hand, some websites are scrupulous about disclosure and pass on links to better offers to readers.

Do the banks police your affiliate links?

Yes, the banks read your blog (as well as the forums).  The banks don’t have an issue with editorial content on your blog, so I never got any feedback for writing, for example, why I thought the American Express Starwood card was overrated or why I wouldn’t get the American Express Business Gold card with 75,000 points.

But they do poke around your site.  Sometimes their concerns are trivial, such as an incorrect spelling or misplaced trademark sign.  And sometimes their concerns are more legitimate such as an incorrect sign-up bonus or minimum spending requirements.

I have been told that I shouldn’t promote other non-affiliate links (with better offers) on certain other cards. But I’ve always stood my ground and worked out creative ways to get around the banks’ concern.  Though I understand why some may not want to negotiate with the banks just to be able to promote an offer which doesn’t earn them a commission.

But Million Mile Secrets readers can usually expect an update every few days on better credit card offers which don’t pay me a commission!

And there have been times when I’ve had my commission earning links removed (and lost hundreds if not thousands of dollars) because I publicized an offer when I first heard about it (despite being told not to) rather than waiting for my affiliate links.

Bottom Line

In tomorrow’s post I’ll list my disclosure and policies around affiliate links and a few tips on how readers can find the best credit card  offers for themselves!

If you liked this post, why don’t you join the 25,000+ readers who have signed-up to receive free blog posts via email (only 1 email per day!) or in an RSS reader …because then you’ll never miss another update!

Editorial Note: We're the Million Mile Secrets team. And we're proud of our content, opinions and analysis, and of our reader's comments. These haven’t been reviewed, approved or endorsed by any of the airlines, hotels, or credit card issuers which we often write about. And that’s just how we like it! :)

Add comment

E-mail is already registered on the site. Please use the Login form or enter another.

You entered an incorrect username or password

Sorry that something went wrong, repeat again!

66comments

by Newest
by Best by Newest by Oldest

Great info- especially the tips on ethics. Often forgotten in affiliate marketing.

It’s an incredibly lucrative niche though- very competitive.

I did some keyword research if you’re looking to monetize financial services traffic.

Check out some of these crazy keyword stats:

The first column is the **keyword**, the second is the **Ahrefs difficulty score** (I filtered it so that it’s below 15), the third column is the **monthly search volume**, and the last column is the **Cost Per Click**.

1 kohls credit card 12 487000 1.3
2 walmart credit card login 14 475000 6
3 jcpenney credit card 9 472000 0.5
4 old navy credit card 14 418000 1.6
5 victoria secret credit card 15 238000 0.9
6 sears credit card login 10 177000 0.3
7 banana republic credit card 12 167000 1.3
8 gap credit card 6 158000 0.8
9 target credit card 13 132000 1.2
10 gamestop credit card 14 125000 2.5
11 shell credit card 14 119000 1.7
12 lane bryant credit card 12 86000 6
13 kohls credit card login 8 85000 0.7
14 american eagle credit card 7 81000 4
15 belk credit card 13 76000 1.2
16 maurices credit card 10 75000 2.5
17 wells fargo credit card 8 69000 4
18 torrid credit card 9 69000 4
19 nordstrom credit card 13 67000 2.5
20 bp credit card 7 58000 2.5

*Source: https://nichefacts.com/credit-card-affiliate-programs

Definitely an amazing niche to get into if you have the traffic or a unique angle.

Interesting info, Ryan! Thanks for sharing!

Hello! I’m looking for an affiliate program for the American Express Platinum card. Are you aware of any that exist for that particular card? I quickly maxed out the available referrals that offered points.

Start Making YOU Money Within Just Days
Until YOU Make 10% to 30% MORE Than You Paid
Within A Really Short Time…
Without You Doing Any Of The Hard Work Involved!

Hi! I like how honest and up front you are. It’s refreshing and warming. I’ve been using points to travel now for about 10 year. 44 countries and 6 continents thus far. I like what you’re doing. Thank you and keep up the good work good people. Cheers!

Hey! I’m a long time reader and huge fan of the blog! I recently came across this post while making a small blog about points/miles and travel to share with friends and family. A lot of them have wanted to sign up for cards through my links but I don’t have referral links for too many cards and I know there is often a cap on referral points earned. I was wondering if I could be approved for affiliate links even being brand new and having low traffic. Would you suggest going with FlexOffers as a newbie or to one of the other sites like CreditKarma. Thanks in advance and thank you for all the great posts over the years and for helping my family and I to travel like we never thought we’d be able to!

Author
Million Mile Secrets

@Dallin – Thanks for reading. Credit Karma no longer provides affiliate links. But you can get links through credit cards.com

Hey MMS! I’m researching an article on hotel rewards cards. I read three Best Of lists: Simple Dollar NerdWallet and Money Crashers. SD and NW didn’t event list the Chase Hyatt Visa, while MC listed in 15 out of 17 cards.

My guess is that they aren’t listing the card because they don’t like the affiliate perks and would rather push the Amex SPG or the Chase Sapphire Preferred (and now the Reserve) because the benefits are better. If that’s the case, it seriously undercuts their credibility as a source of financial advice. If you’re making cash on credit-card application conversions, you don’t have the reader’s best interest in mind.

Load more