United Airlines & Orbitz Suing Skiplagged for Hidden City Ticketing

Disclosure: We get a commission for links on the blog. You don’t have to use our links, but we’re very grateful when you do. American Express, Barclaycard, Chase, and US Bank are Million Mile Secrets advertising partners. Opinions expressed here are the author's alone, and have not been reviewed, approved or endorsed by our partners. Here’s our Advertiser Disclosure.

United Airlines and Orbitz are suing Skiplagged for helping folks buy cheap tickets.

I wrote about hidden city ticketing where you save money buying a ticket to a different city with a connection in the city you want to fly to.

For example, say you want to fly from Des Moines to Dallas, but the ticket is very expensive.  But you can fly from Des Moines to Los Angeles with a connection in Dallas for less.

So you can buy a ticket from Des Moines to Los Angeles and get off the plane in Dallas.

United Airlines Orbitz Suing Skiplagged For Hidden City Ticketing

There Are Risks to Hidden City Ticketing

But the airlines have rules against this.  And because Skiplagged is helping folks with hidden ticketing, Skiplagged is being sued.

Hidden City Ticketing Upsets Airlines

Link:   United Airlines & Orbitz Suing Skiplagged for Hidden City Ticketing  

Link:   Skiplagged

United Airlines and Orbitz are suing the owner of Skiplagged, a website that helps folks find cheap airline tickets by using hidden city ticketing.

United Airlines Orbitz Suing Skiplagged For Hidden City Ticketing

Skiplagged Is Being Sued for Hidden City Ticketing

If you have elite status or a lot of miles with an airline, it’s not a good idea to use hidden city ticketing.  That’s because the airlines can take away your status and airline miles and close your frequent flyer account!

But for folks who don’t have status and mostly fly on award tickets with an occasional paid ticket, it could be worth the risk to save lots of money.

A 1-way ticket from Des Moines to Dallas on January 16, 2015, is $400.

United Airlines Orbitz Suing Skiplagged For Hidden City Ticketing

You’ll Pay $400 to Fly 1-Way From Des Moines to Dallas

But you could buy a 1-way ticket from Des Moines to Los Angeles with a connection in Dallas for $206.

United Airlines Orbitz Suing Skiplagged For Hidden City Ticketing

Connect in Dallas and Save $194

So instead of getting on the connection to Los Angeles you’d get off in Dallas.

If you bought this ticket, you should NOT add your American Airlines frequent flyer number.  Because it’s better to be satisfied with saving $194 while not calling attention to your frequent flyer account.

Bottom Line

United Airlines and Orbitz are suing the owner of Skiplagged for helping folks use hidden city ticketing.

I explained how to use hidden city ticketing to save money on airfare and cautioned that there are risks.

* If you liked this post, why don’t you join the 16,000+ readers who have signed-up to receive free blog posts via email (only 1 email per day!) or in an RSS reader …because then you’ll never miss another update!

* If you liked this post, why don’t you join the 25,000+ readers who have signed-up to receive free blog posts via email (only 1 email per day!) or in an RSS reader …because then you’ll never miss another update!

Editorial Disclaimer: Neither the responses below nor the editorial content on this page are provided or commissioned by the bank advertisers, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertisers. Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of the bank advertisers. It is not the bank advertisers’ responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

7 responses to “United Airlines & Orbitz Suing Skiplagged for Hidden City Ticketing

  1. I am always intrigued by the possibility to fly this way, but I have yet to risk it. I recently had a flight whose agenda was changed by the airline a few weeks before the flight to route through a different intermediate city. If my intent were to get off in that city, I would have been out of luck.

    Also, I have the possibility to drive to a Southwest Airlines airport less than 2 hours away for flights to Chicago, Dallas, and Houston, for $200 RT flights, versus the typical $500 RT fare if I were to use my local airport, with only legacy carriers, 20 minutes away.

  2. There’s no risk with hidden city ticketing on Southwest (except that you may not earn points for your flight).

  3. UAPhil – why is there no risk with SW?

  4. Hello Streisand effect!

  5. @Steve
    Because it’s on a bus system and it must make all its stops!
    A > > B > > C > > D

  6. Martin Killington

    I continually run into a problem with award bookings which is almost the converse of hidden-city ticketing. Let’s say I am trying to fly from Dulles to Madrid. The airline (usually AA or UA) will offer me something like IAD-DFW-LFR-Madrid. But I’m not actually leaving from Dulles, I’m leaving from Nashville where there is no award space. So, in time-honored fashion, I’m trying just to get the overseas leg on an award and I’ll pay for the rest.

    Needless to say, the IAD-DFW accomplishes little for me. I’d rather fly from Nashville to DFW on my own dime and pick up the nonstop to LHR. Nope. It’s not available. If I put in DFW to LHR, I get DFW-IAD-LHR, or DFW-JFK-LHR, etc. Yet no nonstop IAD-LHR is available to me. Is this one of those times it’s worth dealing with the phone, since clearly the award space is available?

    And why do airlines want you to fly more segments and longer distances for the same number of miles? I guess this last question may be answered by Dariaus in the article…

  7. Martin Killington

    Arrgh, the first “LFR” above should be “LHR” of course. We need a 5-minute editing feature!