News You Can Use – 100% Bonus for Sharing US Air Miles & More…

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 1.  US Airways Offering 100% Bonus for Sharing Miles

US Airways is offering a 100% bonus when you share miles, through October 15, 2013.

US Airways Offering a 100% Bonus on Shared Miles

US Airways Offering a 100% Bonus on Shared Miles

The Bonus

Sharing  the maximum amount of 50,000 miles (i.e. paying to transfer them to someone else’s account) costs ~$568, including a $30 processing fee and 7.5% excise tax.

But the person to whom you transfer the miles would earn an extra 50,000 miles.

So you’ve essentially paid 1.14 cents per mile ($568 / 50,000 US Air bonus miles) for the 50,000 bonus miles which is quite a good deal!

Using the Miles

A great use of US Airways Dividend miles is to use 90,000 miles to fly in Business Class from the US to Asia, with a stopover in Europe.  You can redeem US Air miles for travel on any of the Star Alliance member airlines.

You would pay ~$1,026 if you bought 90,000 miles for a Business Class award to North Asia with a stopover in Europe (subject to award availability & taxes and fees, of course) at 1.14 cents per mile.  Note that the maximum bonus is limited to only 50,000 miles per account with this current 100% bonus promotion.

This isn’t such a great deal for domestic coach travel because you’d pay ~$285 for 25,000 miles (25,000 miles X 1.14 cents) which is usually around what a domestic round-trip ticket costs.  But it could make sense for last minute flights or flights on expensive routes.

This could even be worth it for coach tickets to Europe.  For example, it costs 60,000 miles for a coach ticket to Europe.  It would cost ~$684 to buy 60,000 US Air miles (60,000 miles X 1.14 cents per mile), which is often cheaper than the retail price of a coach ticket to Europe.

However, I wouldn’t buy miles unless you have a trip in mind for the miles because the US Air award chart could change at any time.

Terms & Conditions

The Terms & Conditions say that your US Airways account must have been open for at least 12 days before purchasing miles. And the offer ends on October 15, so there isn’t much time to sign-up for a US Air account if you don’t have one!

Each account can earn a maximum of only 50,000 miles as the bonus.

2.  Hilton Offering up to 4X Points per Stay

Via View from the Wing, Hilton is offering up to quadruple points per stay between October 10, 2013 and January 31, 2014.

Hilton Offering up to Quadruple Points per Stay

Hilton Offering up to Quadruple Points per Stay with More Nights, More Points Promotion

While registration is not available yet for this promotion, you can register here starting October 10, 2013.

You earn:

  • Double points on stays of 2 nights
  • Triple points on stays of 3 nights
  • Quadruple points on stays of 4 nights or more

In addition, there are number of hotels that are not participating in this promotion. 

3.  IHG Offering Up to a 50% Bonus on the Purchase of Points

Via One Mile at a Time, IHG is offering up to a 50% bonus when purchasing points, through October 18, 2013.

IHG Offering 50% Bonus on the Purchase of Points

IHG Offering 50% Bonus on the Purchase of Points

IHG Rewards

IHG Rewards hotels include Candlewood SuitesCrowne Plaza,  Holiday InnHoliday Inn ExpressHotel IndigoInterContinental Hotels & Resorts, and Staybridge Suites brand hotels.

The Bonus Offer

The number of bonus points you will receive is based on on the number of points purchased:

  • Buy 1,000 to 19,000 points for a 20% bonus
  • Buy 20,000 to 29,000 points for a 30% bonus
  • Buy 30,000 to 39,000 points for a 40% bonus
  • Buy 40,000 to 60,000 points for a 50% bonus

The best value is to purchase at least 40,000 miles at a 50% bonus, so you pay 0.77 cents per point ($11.50 per 1,000 points).  You may be able to buy points for 0.70 cents per point, so this isn’t a great value.

Putting the Points to Use

IHG Rewards points can be transferred to a number of different airlines at a 1:5 ratio.  This is not a good deal and is an expensive way to earn miles.

Using IHG Rewards points for hotel stays, though, can be a good value.  Here’s IHG Reward’s award chart which start as low as 5,000 points for a PointsBreak award, and cost 50,000 points for a top-end InterContinental hotel.

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17 responses to “News You Can Use – 100% Bonus for Sharing US Air Miles & More…

  1. Could you share 50k to another account for 100k. Share 50K back to original account then just merge both account?

  2. “So you’ve essentially paid 1.14 cents per mile ($568 / 50,000 US Air bonus miles) for the 50,000 bonus miles which is quite a good deal!”

    I’m sorry. Why is that a good deal? More than a penny-a-mile? That’s not even *close* to a good deal….

  3. Pingback: Get 25% to 50% of Your Redeemed US Air Miles Back! | Million Mile Secrets

  4. It could be a god deal for the below reasons (also mentioned by several bloggers):
    1. You want to travel in premium *A cabins in long routes.
    2. You have a large family but can’t find all the seats in one class of service. You can mix-match econ/bus/first etc. to fly together.
    3. These miles should become AA miles if the merger goes through. So, if you value AA miles more than US, then it might be a good deal (if AA explorer and RTW award exists in current form).
    4. Off-peak awards if you don’t have kids in school.
    etc…

  5. You know if it’s possible to have a 2nd account under my name and share between the two in these promos?

  6. Ken,
    Don’t you think paying $568 for a ticket that retails in the tens of thousands is a good deal? I did this last year and am flying myself and my BF to Japan next April with a return through Rome in business class for $1135. I’m definitely doing this again.

  7. @rick b, I have two accounts with the same name and just had the points post for the first transaction. In the process of switching them back.

  8. Hi Darius,
    Will US Airways allowed me to share the miles twice to my husband’s account? He has about 40,000 miles and I was thinking to share 10,000 to his account, so he could share 50,000 to my account, then I share 40,000 to his. Our goal is to get the 50,000 bonus in each account. I know that there’s a $30 fee for each transaction. Thanks!

  9. Pingback: Blog Giveaway: 20,000 US Airways Miles! | Million Mile Secrets

  10. Would I be able to redeem Barclays arrival miles for the 100% transfer bonus cost on us airways?

  11. How do you all get the $568/50K?
    When I tried to purchase 50k, it says $1750 + $30.

    Please advise.

  12. Darius, I appreciate your reply.
    However, this deal is only for whom already have over 50k miles in their account.
    Not worth for people, including myself, who do not have enough balance.
    To purchase, it costs over $1880 (to purchase) +$568 (to share).
    What a disappointing.